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‘Duck Sauce Killer’ Glenn Hirsch kills himself ahead of court date

The suspected “Duck Sauce Killer” accused of gunning down a Chinese-food delivery man in Queens committed suicide Friday ahead of a court hearing that could’ve landed him back behind bars.

Glenn Hirsch – finally unmasked in a mug shot obtained by The Post – had been out on bail when he shot himself at home ahead of a morning hearing in Queens Supreme Court, law-enforcement sources said.

The 51-year-old suspect was found dead on the couch wearing rubber gloves with the gun in his hand and the radio blaring to the point where it could be heard by cops outside the door, sources said.

It appeared he had meticulously prepared to kill himself, sources said. He put plastic over the couch before pulling the trigger, and a type-written suicide note several pages long lay at his feet, sources said.

Glenn Hirsch was accused of murdering a Chinese delivery worker.
Matthew McDermott
Glenn Hirsch body being brought out of his apartment by morgue workers.
Ellis Kaplan for NY Post

Hirsch had e-mailed the lengthy note to his lawyers, prosecutors and others involved in the case, denying murdering Zhiwen Yan on April 30 amid the suspect’s feud with the restaurant over duck sauce.

“This is my dying declaration,” Hirsch wrote, according to a source.

His lawyer, Michael Horn, told The Post, “He left a long note, but essentially, he became overwhelmed by the press coverage and the media attention and the rush to vilification, and he didn’t take care of his mental health, which is obviously something he needed to do, and he became depressed and suicidal.”

In the missive, the suspect accused prosecutors of rushing to judgement in Yan’s murder and said video evidence implicating him in it was inconclusive.

Zhiwen Yan was allegedly murdered by Hirsch over duck sauce.
Kunying Zhao/GoFundMe

Hirsch also tried to exonerate his wife, Dorothy Hirsh, over her arrest in late June, when an early-morning raid turned up eight handguns and ammunition at her home.

Glenn insisted in the letter that the weapons belonged to him and she had no knowledge of them, law-enforcement sources said. The pair had not lived together for years, and she was not in his home when he died, sources said.

Glenn wrote in the note that he knew he was going to be charged with weapons raps during the Friday hearing and would likely be sent back to jail because the guns were linked to him through DNA. He said he wasn’t willing to sit in a cell for years and didn’t want to fight the gun charges from behind bars.

Glenn Hirsch committed suicide before a morning court hearing.

The note, described by sources as “oddly coherent and vast in scope,” included long tangents about other cases heard in Queens County, too.

In the case of Yan’s death, Glenn had had an ongoing beef with the Great Wall restaurant in Forest Hills where the victim, a father of three, worked as a delivery man. Glenn claimed the eatery shorted him on duck sauce in an order placed last year.

The restaurant’s owner, Ken Yang, had said Glenn repeatedly harassed him and his workers, claiming the accused killer vandalized his car and showed up at the eatery with a gun in January.

Hours before Yan was gunned down, police said surveillance footage captured Glenn circling Great Wall in his car, then tailing the delivery man to his next food drop.

Yan was shot in the chest and left bleeding on the pavement.

“Why did he kill himself?” Yang said of Glenn. “I wanted him to go to jail forever.”

The owner, who considered Yan like kin, added, “I lost my brother, a member of my family.

Yan was killed last April.

“I wanted [Glenn] to go to court and for him to say why he killed my brother. I wanted him to talk, tell everybody why he wanted to kill me and my family, too.

“How did [Glenn] get a gun?  How did he still have one more gun? He could have come here and shoot everybody. He lived less than a mile away from here.”

Yang said he hasn’t been able to sleep since Yan’s death because all he sees is his “brother’s face.

“When I drive somewhere, I look around. I don’t go straight home. I look to see if anybody is following me,” he said.

Jennifer Wu, the lawyer for Yan’s kin, told The Post his family is in “shock” over Glenn’s suicide and that his widow “doesn’t even know what to say at this point.

“The shock relates to what a waste. To kill someone and then kill yourself. Two lives lost. I think there is the initial shock of ‘how do I seek justice now?’ but that isn’t the primary concern,” Wu said.

“The primary concern is another life is lost. It’s the shock of death.”

Hirsch had been out on bail when he shot himself ahead of a court hearing Friday.
Robert Mecea

A father of two young boys who lives on the same floor as Hirsch in his Briarwood apartment building said Friday he was upset that the suspect was allowed to return home and gain access to a gun.

“My question is how did he have a gun because they checked his place. What is to say he wouldn’t shoot someone singing in the hallway,” he said.

“I’m glad he is gone. He is a coward. Look what he did for duck sauce? I just feel relieved,” the man told The Post under the condition of anonymity. “I can have my kids go down the hall and drop the garbage out now. I was scared to have them go, you know what I mean.”

Glenn was freed from custody June 27 after his brother paid his $500,000 bail.

The next day, his wife was arrested on weapons charges, but Glenn claimed in the letter he had moved the guns into her closet “years ago” after he closed a storage unit, Dorothy’s lawyer, Mark Bederow, told The Post.

“This is a terrible time for Dorothy.  This tragedy of her husband’s suicide is amplified by the fact that she is already being subjected to an unwarranted prosecution for guns, which so obviously were Glenn’s,” the lawyer said.

“As if this isn’t bad enough, in Glenn’s suicide letter, he detailed Dorothy’s innocence. … Fully aware that he was going to end his life, he was adamant that Dorothy was innocent, which we have always maintained and should be apparent to anyone who is familiar with this case.”

Bederow called on the Queens District Attorney Melinda Katz to drop the charges against Dorothy so she can “grieve this loss without the additional stress of fighting baseless criminal charges.”

Katz’s office said they can’t comment on pending cases but issued a statement about Glenn’s death.

“The loss of a human life is always tragic. Obviously, we would have preferred to try Mr. Glenn Hirsch for the calculated murder of Mr. Zhiwen Yan in a court of law, but this is no longer an option,” Katz said.

“We once again express our deepest condolences to the family and friends of Mr. Zhiwen Yan, who continue to grieve his tragic and senseless loss.”

Additional reporting by Haley Brown

If you are struggling with suicidal thoughts or are experiencing a mental health crisis and live in New York City, you can call 1-888-NYC-WELL for free and confidential crisis counseling. If you live outside the five boroughs, you can dial the 24/7 National Suicide Prevention hotline at 1-800-273-8255 or go to SuicidePreventionLifeline.org.