The Simpsons: TikTok users thinks cartoon’s prediction of rising energy bills was spookily accurate

Cartoon predicted energy prices rising at the same rate as an Office for National Statistics report

Nancy Cartwright, voice of Bart Simpson, surprises Stormzy in brilliant clip

Social media users believe that The Simpsons has once again predicted a major news story.

In recent years, the cartoon series has become known for its uncanny ability to seemingly guess what will happen in the future.

Amid our current cost of living crisis, some fans have theorised that the soaring bills was also shown on an old episode of The Simpsons.

In the 2013 episode “A Test Before Trying”, Mr Burns announces that energy bills are set to rise.

To decide how much your electricity bills will rise, I’ve assembled a team of distinguished economists and placed plausible rate hike percentages on their backs,” he says.

“Now we will use unfettered free market principles to arrive at a number. Now, release the hounds.”

The economists are then chased before dogs, with one catching the person with a 17 per cent sign on his back.

“And there you have it folks. Rates will rise a healthy 17 per cent,” Mr Burns concludes.

One TikTok user pointed out that the Office for National Statistics said that after the energy price cap rose in October last year, “consumer prices for gas and electricity rose by 17.1% and 8.7% respectively”.

Just last month, Simpsons fans said that the animated show had seen the UK heatwave coming.

You can read more of The Simpsons’ best predictions here.

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